What Size Am I? - General Size Guide

Carol Ching

What Size Am I?  - General Size Guide

How to Choose the right Size Ski & Snowboard Helmet?

1. Measure your Head
Take a soft measuring tape and wrap it around your head about 1 inch above your eyebrows and ears. Most helmets are measured in centimeters, so unless you love calculations, measure your head in centimeters. For example, if you measure the circumference of your head and it is 56 cm, you will wear a 56 cm helmet or Medium (55-58cm) depending on the helmet’s size scale. Don’t have a soft tape measure? Take a piece of string and wrap it around your head and then measure the string.

2. Try it on
After you receive your helmet put it on. The helmet should feel snug. A properly fitting helmet needs to be snug all the way around your head so that it doesn’t move around. You don’t want any excess space between the helmet and your head. Be careful to pay attention to any pressure or pain points.
3. Shake Test
With the helmet on your head, shake your head around. If the helmet moves on its own or shakes separately from your head, it’s too big. Use your hand and move the helmet to the left and right, up and down. The skin of your head should move with the helmet without the helmet shifting on its own. You can choose to buckle the helmet at this point if you wish, but it will not impact the fit of the actual helmet, just keep the helmet on your head.

Smith Helmet Size Chart

Adult Helmets

Size Head Circumference (cm)
Small 51 - 55
Medium 55 - 59
Large 59 - 63
XL 63 - 67

Junior Helmets

Size Head Circumference (cm)
Youth Small 48 - 53
Youth Medium 53 - 58
Youth S/M 48 - 56
X Small 52 - 54
Small 54 - 56
Medium 56 - 58
Large 58 - 60
XL 60 - 62

POC Helmet Size Chart

Adult Helmets

Size Head Circumference (cm)
XS - S 51 - 54
M - L 55 - 58
XL - XXL 59 - 62
XS 51 - 52
S 53 - 54
M 55 - 56
L 57 - 58
XL 59 - 60
XXL 61 - 62

Junior Helmets

Size Head Circumference (cm)
XS - S 51 - 54
M - L 55 - 58

Giro Helmet Size Chart

Adult Helmets

Size Head Circumference (cm)
S 52 - 55.5
M 55.5 - 59
L 59 - 62.5
XL 62.5 - 65

Junior Helmets

Size Head Circumference (cm)
XS 48.5 - 52
S 52 - 55.5
M 55.5 - 59

Goggle Sizes and Fits

There are dozens of different shapes and sizes of goggles to choose from and one may fit your face and sense of style better than the others. The frames of your ski and snowboard goggles have the biggest influence on the fit and field of view that they provide. While goggle frames come in all sizes and shapes, they basically have three jobs: hold your lens in place, keep snow out, and make your face as comfortable as possible. Any frame should be able to handle the first two parts, so the crucial part is fit. Here are some things to keep in mind:



Many adults can comfortably fit into multiple sizes of goggles, but here are some general guidelines. A simple way to think about frame size is that it often times correlates with the size of your head so if you wear a small helmet consider a small frame and if you wear a large or extra-large helmet consider a larger frame, medium to large helmet consider a medium frame size. Here are some other ways to think about frame size:

Small Frame

This size will fit kids and youth, as well as adults with a smaller faces.

Medium Frame

Medium sized frames will fit most people. It should be noted here as well that most goggles are essentially unisex, apart from color schemes and shapes.

 

Large, Oversized Frames

Size does matter, and not just because of the fit of the goggles either. Many manufacturers are producing large and/or oversized goggles with the intent of providing more peripheral vision. Wearing a larger goggle will provide you with more lens for the amount of frame, helping you get the widescreen, full director’s cut of your winter adventures. Not everyone’s face fits a large, oversized goggle, nor are all helmets compatible with them, however.
These styles give you a bigger field of vision both horizontally and vertically, which translates into better peripheral vision (great for snowboarding) and a better view of what is above and below you (good for steeps). If you’re spinning tricks in the park, a thinner frame is also advantageous because it allows you to track the ground better when in the air. But even if you are just sticking to the bunny slopes, increased peripheral vision allows you to see hazards before they become an issue.

OTG (Over the Glasses)

OTG or over-the-glasses, ski & snowboard goggles are designed to allow you to wear your prescription eyeglasses under your ski or snowboard goggles. This is a much less expensive option than a goggle with a custom prescription lens. OTG goggles are deeper than regular goggles and have channels built-in for the arms of your glasses. With OTG goggles, your glasses shouldn’t move inside the goggles and there should be no discomfort or pressure from your glasses on your nose or temples. Try them on together and make sure everything lines up securely, especially if you wear larger framed prescription glasses.

Asian Fit

There’s something to be said for perfectly fit eyewear. And for snow goggles, that fit is the difference between performance and putting your run on hold to fix them. But even if you tried the small, medium, and large of your favorite snow goggles, there may still be a gap between your nose and the foam seal above. A gap that will let in air, moisture, and snow to ruin your cruise down the slope. That’s because snow goggle sizing doesn’t account for variation in nose bridge size. Instead, try on asian fit snow goggles. They have extra foam lining at the nose bridge to form a complete seal around the face to give you that perfect fit.


Ski Sizing for Kids

It's important to choose the correct length skis for children so that they can have the most fun possible on the mountain and so that they can learn and improve their technique. Height and weight are both important determinants in selecting the correct size skis for kids. A good rule of thumb is that youth skis should come up somewhere between the child's chest and nose. Need a starting point? Use the Kids' Ski Size Chart below.

How to Find the Right Size Skis For Kids:

1. Measure your child's height and weight.
2. Locate that height on the kids' ski size chart below.
3. Line up their height with the corresponding ski length to get the correct ski size range.

Kids Size Chart

Age (yrs) Height (in) Height (cm) Weight (lbs) Weight (kg) Ski Length (cm)
3 37 94 34 14 70 - 80
4 40 102 37 16 80 - 90
5 43 109 42 18 90 - 100
6 45 114 46 21 95 - 105
7 47 119 50 23 100 - 110
8 50 127 57 26 110 - 120
9 53 135 63 29 115 - 125
10 55 140 70 32 120 - 130
11 57 145 79 36 130 - 140
12 59 149 89 41 135 - 145
13 61 156 100 46 130 - 140
14 65 164 112 51 150 - 160

What if my child is in between the heights listed on the size chart?

Your child might be between two of the heights listed; in that case find their weight on the chart. If they are light for their height, you're going to size a ski to the shorter height, and therefore will end up with shorter skis. If they are heavy for their height, you'll go off the taller height and end up with longer skis.

Reasons to size kids' skis shorter, closer to the chest:

- They are a beginner or cautious skier
- Their weight is lighter than average for their height.
- They like to make short quick turns and ride at slower speeds.


Reasons to size kids' skis longer, closer to the nose:

- They are skiing fast and aggressively
- They weight more than average for their height.
- You want to purchase a ski with room to grow. Children grow fast and there are boots and outerwear designed to accommodate this, however, we do not recommend sizing their skis much bigger than the recommended range.


Snowboard for Kids

Height and weight are important considerations when selecting the correct size snowboard for kids. If you are still unsure, you can take into account the skill level of the rider and size up or down. A good rule of thumb is that youth snowboards should come up somewhere between the child's chest and chin. You will find individual size charts on individual snowboard product detail pages for each of the snowboards we sell. Need a starting point? Use the Kids' Snowboard Size Chart below.

How to Find the Right Size Snowboard For Kids:

1. Measure your child's height and weight.
2. Locate that height on the kids' ski size chart below.
3.Line up their height with the corresponding snowboard length.

Kids Size Chart

Age (yrs) Height (in) Height (cm) Weight (lbs) Weight (kg) Ski Length (cm)
3 37 94 34 14 <80
4 40 102 37 16 80 - 90
5 43 109 42 18 85 - 95
6 45 114 46 21 90 - 100
7 47 119 50 23 95 - 105
8 50 127 57 26 100 - 110
9 53 135 63 29 115 - 125
10 55 140 70 32 105 - 120
11 57 145 79 36 110 - 125
12 59 149 89 41 125 - 135
13 61 156 100 46 130 - 145
14 65 164 112 51 140 - 150

What if my child is in between the heights listed on the size chart?

Your child might be between two of the heights listed; in that case find their weight on the chart. If they are light for their height, you're going to size a ski to the shorter height, and therefore will end up with shorter snowboard. If they are heavy for their height, you'll go off the taller height and end up with longer snowboard.

Reasons to size kids' snowboards shorter, closer to the chest:

- They are a beginner or cautious snowboarder
- Their weight is lighter than average for their height.
- They like to make short quick turns and ride at slower speeds.


Reasons to size kids' snowboards longer, closer to the nose:

- They are boarding fast and aggressively
- They weight more than average for their height.
- You want to purchase a snowboard with room to grow. Children grow fast and there are boots and outerwear designed to accommodate this, however, we do not recommend sizing their snowboard much bigger than the recommended range.



What Length Should My Skis Be?

The length of your ski depends on your height, weight, skiing style & ability. There isn't an exact formula for determining the right size but in general the proper ski length should be between your chin and the top of your head. For example, a skier that is 6' tall will want to look for a skis between 170 - 190 cm. The exact right size for you will depend on your skiing ability and style. Some things to consider as well are the ski category, type of terrain and snow you'll be skiing in. Beginner skiers will tend to want a shorter ski for easier turn initiation and stability, whereas an advance skier will want longer skis.

Ski Sizing Chart

Skier Height (ft) Skier Height (cm) Suggested Ski Lengths (cm) Shop Ski Lengths
4'4" 132 115-130 130-139
4'6" 137 125-140
4'8" 142 130-145 140-149
4'10" 147 135-150
5 152 135-155 150-159
5'2" 158 145-165
5'4" 163 150-170 160-169
5'6" 168 155-175
5'8" 173 160-180 170-179
5'10" 178 165-185
6' 183 170-190 180-189
6'2" 188 175-195
6'4" 193 180-200 190-199

How to Choose Ski Poles

The traditional method of choosing the correct length ski poles is to turn the ski poles upside down and hold them underneath the basket. In this position, your arms should be at a 90 degree angle when your upper arms are at your sides. Some skiers may prefer to use longer or shorter poles. See our ski poles size chart for an approximation of ski pole length by height.

Ski Pole Size Chart

Skier Height (ft) Pole Size (in) Pole Size (cm)
6'7" + 56 140
6'4" - 6'6" 54 135
6'1" - 6'3" 52 130
5'10" - 6'0 49 125
5'7" - 5'9" 48 120
5'4" - 5'6" 46 115
5'1" - 5'3" 44 110
4'9" - 5'0" 42 105
4'5" - 4'8" 40 100
4'1" - 4'4" 38 95
3'9" - 4'0" 36 90
3'5" - 3'8" 34 85
3'4" 32 80

What Size Snowboard Should I Get?

How do you pick the correct snowboard length? The length of your snowboard will vary depending on your body weight and the type of riding you plan to do. Back in the day, traditional snowboard sizing meant you stand next to the snowboard and if the top hits your chin, great, it fits! While that may be a good place to start, things like ability level, weight, and construction of the board are also important factors in determining the appropriate board length. So, for example, if you are going to be mostly freeriding consider getting a slightly longer board for more stability and speed, unless you’re looking at a volume shifted board. If it's a freestyle snowboard you are looking for, consider smaller sizes that will be easier to spin and maneuver in the terrain park or half-pipe.

Additionally, consider the following factors when deciding on a snowboard size:
- If you're riding primarily in the park or freestyle, pick a board on the shorter end of the size range.
- If you're riding is mostly all mountain, powder or freeriding, consider a snowboard on the longer end of the size range or grabbing a volume shifted board.
- If you are above average weight consider a longer snowboard.
- If you are a beginner, aim for a shorter board in your size range.

Snowboard Sizing Chart

Rider Height (ft) Rider Height (cm) Rider Weight (lb) Snowboard Size
4'10" 147 110-120 128-136
5' 152 115-130 133-141
5'2" 158 125-135 139-147
5'4" 163 135-145 144-152
5'6" 168 140-155 149-157
5'8" 173 150-165 154-162
5'10" 178 170-185 159-167
6' 183 155-175 160+
6'2" 188 180-195 160+
6'4" 193 190-205 160+

Gloves Size and Fit

It’s important that your gloves or mittens fit you properly. Properly sized gloves or mitts provide greater dexterity, warmth and comfort. For the best performance, a proper fitting glove should fit snugly and allow enough room at the end of outstretched fingers for you to pinch about a quarter of an inch of fabric. Also, make sure your palm is completely inside the cuff so your wrist remains covered. When you make a fist, the fit shouldn’t be so tight that is constricts your fingers from curving fully. Manufacturers use different numeric and letter sizing sytems to measure handwear, normally measuring the circumference around the widest part of the hand in inches or centimeters, so consult their sizing chart when buying.

Outerwear Fit and Jacket Lengths

To feel great, it must fit well. Good fitting outerwear means outerwear that fits your body type, your use, and your style. All three of these should be taken into consideration when determining which fit is best for you.


With so many outerwear brands available, and each with its own set of fits, it can be difficult to know how a jacket or pant actually fits. What one brand calls "athletic" another brand may call "baggy". You may also know or have heard of certain brands having a reputation for a tighter or a looser fit. Keep in mind that all brands change and evolve, and although some brands do tend to fit a certain way, that same brand may make a range of fits from very slim to very loose. Don't worry; we have standardized fit across the board, making it easy for you to get the right fit.

Slim Fit


If you can't stand the thought of your pant legs touching the ground or your jacket bunching at the chest when you bend over, then you're going to need a slim fit. With a more technical fit, you can expect:

- Outerwear is much more streamlined, promoting a wide range of motion (perfect for touring or pole-whacking).

- Jackets fit much closer to the body (sometimes limiting your layers) and have a more tailored or fitted profile, often with a waist-length cut.

- Pants are slimmer through the thigh and knee and won't go much below the ankle when standing up straight. Recent styles have begun to trend towards a slimmer leg through the knee, then flaring towards the ankle to accommodate boots.

This tighter fit, sometimes referred to as "alpinist," has a more minimalist look and feel that's grown more and more popular in the techy or fashion forward circles of our sports. You'll also find many of today's softshells and technical layers tend to be an alpine fit. Slimmer profile shredders should definitely check out some slim fitting options.

Regular Fit

When you buy a regular fit, you're buying a product that's not too tight, not too baggy, but right in the middle. If you're a little unsure of what fits you best but have an average build, shop around for a regular fit. With a traditional fit, you can expect:

- Outerwear will have plenty of room for layering but won't look like a yeti when not wearing many layers underneath.

- Outerwear will have plenty of room for layering but won't look like a yeti when not wearing many layers underneath.

- Pants are slimmer through the thigh and knee and won't go much below the ankle when standing up straight. Recent styles have begun to trend towards a slimmer leg through the knee, then flaring towards the ankle to accommodate boots.

Pants will have a standard inseam with a cut that's straight through the leg.

Loose Fit

Outerwear with a baggier fit is designed to have more coverage all around, while maximizing room for layers underneath. With a baggier fit, you can expect:

- Outerwear will have extra room all over with enough coverage no matter how you twist or move.

- Jackets will have more room throughout the body and sleeves, and tend to be longer when compared to a regular or traditional fit - think sweatshirt vs. sweater.

Pants are going to be relaxed at the waist and much roomier throughout the thigh, knee, and cuff.

- This style has become popular among park skiers and snowboarders who want a baggy look more than they care about the actual fit. Brands are now designing lines just for them. Also, brands that were known as more traditional in the past, now make fits that appeal to a newer generation seeking a more progressive fit.

What are the types of baselayers?

Baselayers are loosely organized into light, mid and heavy weight categories based on the fabric's weight per square meter (or sometimes ounce per square yard). Every brand has different cut offs for what light, mid and heavy weight actually means, so take this classification with a grain of salt!

Lightweight | <200 grams/M²

This is a thin first layer that goes next to your skin with the ability to easily add layers over it. Lightweight base layers are a crucial step in layering as they must be comfortable on the skin and are designed to fit tighter for the best moisture management. Worn alone, they are best suited for mild to cool conditions with high levels of activity like running, climbing, cross-country skiing, touring etc.

Midweight | <270 grams/m²

A midweight layer can be worn as a warmer first layer or as a second layer over your next-to-skin layer, providing a combination of insulation and moisture wicking. Alone, it is best suited to cool or moderately cool to cold conditions with medium levels of activity where you will be moving some of the time but standing still at others. It can be combined with lightweight layers underneath or heavyweight layers over it to accomplish the desired warmth.

Heavyweight | 250 grams/m² +

This is designed for cold conditions combined with any level of activity and often referred to as "expedition or thermal weight." Almost always worn over a lighter weight layer, heavyweight layers are designed to add insulation and are worn looser with less focus on moisture management. These layers are thicker due to their higher loft for insulation.